Let´s talk anime with Aya Suzuki

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At this years annual Frame by Frame animation seminar in Oslo one of the guests were Aya Suzuki, a british-japanese animator, that gave us a talk about her experiences working on anime in Japan. Aya has had the pleasure of working with both Hayao Miyazaki and Mamoru Hosoda on such films as The Wind Rises and Wolf Children.

Mangapolis didn´t miss the opportunity to have a chat with Aya Suzuki. Quite naturally the conversation started off with Hayao Miyazaki and Mamoru Hosoda; how many times do you talk to anyone that has worked with the two names anyway? The topic had to come up at some point, and there can´t be a better topic to break the ice.

Having worked with both of the famous directors Suzuki could tell that Miyazaki and Hosoda couldn´t be more different in the way they work. Where Miyazaki likes to have full control and is involved in all the stages and aspects of the movie; Hosoda manage to rely more on the people around him and he trust them to do their part. Miyazaki will redo everything himself if he´s not satisfied; while Hosoda gives animators a very brief instructions of what he wants, and trust the animators to produce the best possible result.

Aya Suzuki´s dream to become an animator started when she was a teenager. In Japan “everybody” watch anime and the interest doesn´t end in childhood. While in Europe most people will stop watching animated series when they enter the teenage years the Japanese has a completely different culture; there is an anime aimed at all ages, so when you grow out of one series, there is always another waiting. In Japan no one ever has the chance to grow out of anime, it´s a brilliant business strategy, Suzuki laughs.

Of the animators between the age of twenty and thirty the majority are female animators, but the numbers even out as many of the female animators marry and “retire” as they enter their thirties. Suzuki feels that Miyazaki´s movies influenced both girls and boys of her generation in a great way; so Suzuki was not the only one that developed a dream of becoming an animator.

Every animator has his or hers speciality within animation, Suzuki reveals, there are basically two main categories that animators fall into: There are those that grew up with Bruce Lee movies (she smiles as she says this) and are extremely good at animating action scenes. For those in this category action scenes comes naturally and they master the movement of the action like they are choreographing a dance. But usually the same animators come short when asked to do “every-day scenes”; these scenes are the other category where Aya Suzuki feels more comfortable.

There are those animators that can master both categories like Takeshi Honda and Toshiyuki Inoue.

Aya Suzuki tries to challenge herself and develop as an animator by taking on projects where she has to animate action. Even though she claims that action scenes is not her speciality I was extremely impressed by her action scene from Death Billiards (2013) that she screened at the Frame by Frame seminar.

Like most animators in Japan Aya Suzuki works as a freelance and has been involved on many different projects for many different studios. At the same time is very usual for freelance animators to work exclusively for one studio even though they are not directly employed by them. It is extremely hard to get into the big studios, like Studio Ghibli, and it is impossible to get a job there by normal means. You will have to be recommended by someone.

Suzuki was recommended to join the team working on Wolf Children because she had worked on Sylvan Chomet´s The Illusionist which is a movie Hosoda happens to be influenced by. And from there she was recommended to other studios, and this is the usual arrangement between the big studios in Japan, Suzuki says. To be recommended by one studio is a sign of quality and in this way freelance animators can jump between the studios.

These days Aya Suzuki has a permanent job in Europe on the weekdays and works as a freelance from her bedroom in London in the weekends. She has often planed that she will have to say no when they call from Japan, but usually she somehow ends up accepting more projects instead. There is always some project that sound tempting, she laughs.

Anime at Frame by Frame March 15th at Filmens Hus

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The annual Frame by Frame animation seminar is back at Filmens Hus/Cinemateket March 15th. The great thing about FxF is the intimate and laid-back format of the seminar. A great place to get familiar with the animation industry and to have conversations with both the veterans and rookies in animation. If you have a good idea for an animation and looking for a place to discuss it with those in the industry; FxF is the place for you. Bring your portfolio!

This year Japanese animation is represented by a screening of Miyazaki´s The Wind Rises (2013) and special guest Aya Suzuki. Tickets for the movie is included in the seminar pass.

For those not familiar with Aya Suzuki; she is an animator that has worked on some of the major anime productions in Japan, including The Wind Rises (2013) and Wolf Children (2012) that are both titles which has screened under the Mangapolis Anime Programme at Films from the South.

Please check out Aya´s blog here.

Together with Films from the South we at Mangapolis will hold an interview with Aya Suzuki that will be posted both at this site and over at filmfrasor.no. So after you meet her at FxF you get another chance to know more about her in our interview.

Oh yeah, before I forget to mention it; Lars Hemmingby will hold a short presentation of the Mangapolis Comic at FxF. A showcase of concept art from the horror-gothic-steam punk-weird science-film noiresque-murder mystery-zombie-extravaganza-o-rama-tron-o-matic that is Mangapolis: The Comic.

Frame by Frame poster by Christopher Nielsen

 

First Weekend with Anime at Films from the South

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At Films from the South this weekend Sunday was Mangapolis day with a total of six screenings of anime at Oslo Kino. I would like to take the opportunity to thank all of those cool people that came to the screenings. And there was a lot of you! As last year Japanese Anime attract an audience. Not any audience either, the best audience in my opinion! And here is why: As I introduced several of the Mangapolis screenings I recognized that a lot of you were present at several of the anime screenings. Meaning that you must have had a very busy day, indeed! Thanks to you all!

Next weekend will not only be a Mangapolis day, it will be a Mangapolis WEEKEND! A total of ten anime screenings during the weekend. It´s mad! But you awesome people are just mad enough to handle it!

As always, check out Film from the South´s festival webpage for the full Mangapolis program (remember that you can also buy tickets directly from the site). And don´t forget to vote on your favorite movie at the festival to win the audience award (it is possible to vote at filmfrasor.no). I´m not gonna try to influence your votes, but last year the anime Wolf Children won the audience award, and it would be really cool if an anime ran away with the award this year as well.

A Few Easy Steps to Watch Anime at Films from the South

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To make it super easy for all of us to get our injection of Anime during the Films from the South Festival you can now order tickets directly from filmfrasor.no. Just browse through the easy-to-use interface on the festival site and find the movies you like to watch; and simply order the tickets. It has never been easier!

See the full Mangapolis program here with trailers.

And don´t forget the Gotta Watch ´em All competition! Collect tickets stubs from six of the Anime films during the film festival and have a chance to win prices from Neo Tokyo and Oslo Kino. Read here for more info.

The Wind Rises Ready for Films from the South!

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Greetings! For those that already visited filmfrasor.no today might have read the news that Hayao Miyazaki´s latest (and possibly last) film The Wind Rises is ready for Films from the South 2013! That will be the first screening of The Wind Rises in Norway before it is ready for regular cinema screenings in 2014.

The Wind Rises is a story of Jiro Horikoshi, the designer of the legendary Japanese Zero fighter aircraft that played a key role during WW2. All you history buffs out there will know how feared and efficient killing machine the Zero was; obviously a hell of a design. The movie is however not about the Zero, but rather a story of a young boy dreaming of taking to the skies. This dream leads him to study engineering and eventually become an aircraft designer. Which takes him into employment at an aircraft manufacturer where he is put to work on fighter plane designs. Weapons of war. Needless to say, the subject of the movie is controversial. But the movie is more about one man´s dream and a  how he makes that particular dream come true than a political commentary on war and peace.

In any case it is simply amazing that this movie will screen at Films from the South 2013 and not only that, it is the closing movie of the festival. The first anime to have that honor. Let´s make it annual, I´ll say!

The Wind Rises is the second anime movie that is officially ready for Films from the South 2013, the first was 009 RE:Cyborg confirmed way back in June. There will be more Japanese anime at the festival as part of the Mangapolis programme. All the anime titles will be released with the rest of the titles for the festival on filmfrasor.no on September 27th, so make sure you drop by there then!

 

Also, keep your eyes peeled for possible early sneak peeks here as well. wink wink nudge nudgeEricTerry